Undocumented Mexicans in the USA

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Author :
Publisher : Cambridge University Press
ISBN 13 : 9780521382472
Total Pages : 260 pages
Book Rating : 4.3/5 (824 download)

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Book Synopsis Undocumented Mexicans in the USA by : David M. Heer

Download or read book Undocumented Mexicans in the USA written by David M. Heer and published by Cambridge University Press. This book was released on 1990-11-30 with total page 260 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: When this volume was published in 1990, undocumented Mexican immigrants had become an important component of the US population. In this book the author analyzes the results of a unique survey conducted in Los Angeles County, where an estimated 44 percent of the undocumented Mexican population lived. The survey allows the author to make comparisons among the groups of undocumented and legal Mexican immigrants and to study the effects of legal status on their living conditions. The author also examines the findings of a number of other social scientists, providing a comprehensive summary of the data on undocumented Mexicans in the US. In his conclusion, he turns to an evaluation of policy options for incorporating this group into the US population and for immigrants. The book will be useful to sociologists and other social scientists as well as to lawyers and policy experts studying the problem of illegal immigrants.

Detained and Deported

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Publisher : Beacon Press
ISBN 13 : 0807079839
Total Pages : 272 pages
Book Rating : 4.8/5 (7 download)

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Book Synopsis Detained and Deported by : Margaret Regan

Download or read book Detained and Deported written by Margaret Regan and published by Beacon Press. This book was released on 2016-05-03 with total page 272 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: An intimate look at the people ensnared by the US detention and deportation system, the largest in the world On a bright Phoenix morning, Elena Santiago opened her door to find her house surrounded by a platoon of federal immigration agents. Her children screamed as the officers handcuffed her and drove her away. Within hours, she was deported to the rough border town of Nogales, Sonora, with nothing but the clothes on her back. Her two-year-old daughter and fifteen-year-old son, both American citizens, were taken by the state of Arizona and consigned to foster care. Their mother’s only offense: living undocumented in the United States. Immigrants like Elena, who’ve lived in the United States for years, are being detained and deported at unprecedented rates. Thousands languish in detention centers—often torn from their families—for months or even years. Deportees are returned to violent Central American nations or unceremoniously dropped off in dangerous Mexican border towns. Despite the dangers of the desert crossing, many immigrants will slip across the border again, stopping at nothing to get home to their children. Drawing on years of reporting in the Arizona-Mexico borderlands, journalist Margaret Regan tells their poignant stories. Inside the massive Eloy Detention Center, a for-profit private prison in Arizona, she meets detainee Yolanda Fontes, a mother separated from her three small children. In a Nogales soup kitchen, deportee Gustavo Sanchez, a young father who’d lived in Phoenix since the age of eight, agonizes about the risks of the journey back. Regan demonstrates how increasingly draconian detention and deportation policies have broadened police powers, while enriching a private prison industry whose profits are derived from human suffering. She also documents the rise of resistance, profiling activists and young immigrant “Dreamers” who are fighting for the rights of the undocumented. Compelling and heart-wrenching, Detained and Deported offers a rare glimpse into the lives of people ensnared in America’s immigration dragnet.

Undocumented Immigrants

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Author :
Publisher : Greenhaven Publishing LLC
ISBN 13 : 1534562249
Total Pages : 64 pages
Book Rating : 4.5/5 (345 download)

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Book Synopsis Undocumented Immigrants by : Cathleen Small

Download or read book Undocumented Immigrants written by Cathleen Small and published by Greenhaven Publishing LLC. This book was released on 2017-12-15 with total page 64 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Who are undocumented immigrants? What happens to undocumented immigrants after they are discovered in the United States? These questions and more are answered by this comprehensive look at a hot topic that is often debated on news programs and online. The accessible, objective text and full-color photographs give readers a balanced look at this complicated issue, and detailed sidebars provide additional information. Readers will benefit from having their critical-thinking skills strengthened as they examine this challenging issue.

Undocumented Immigrants in the United States [2 volumes]

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Author :
Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN 13 : 0313384258
Total Pages : 941 pages
Book Rating : 4.3/5 (133 download)

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Book Synopsis Undocumented Immigrants in the United States [2 volumes] by : Anna Ochoa O'Leary

Download or read book Undocumented Immigrants in the United States [2 volumes] written by Anna Ochoa O'Leary and published by Bloomsbury Publishing USA. This book was released on 2014-02-25 with total page 941 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This two-volume reference work addresses the dynamic lives of undocumented immigrants in the United States and establishes these individuals' experiences as a key part of our nation's demographic and sociological evolution. This two-volume work supplies accessible and comprehensive coverage of this complex subject by consolidating the insights of hundreds of scholars who have studied the issues of undocumented immigration in the United States for years. It provides a historical perspective that underscores the exponential growth of the undocumented population in the last three decades and presents a more nuanced, more detailed, and therefore more accurate portrait of undocumented immigrants than is available in general media. Also included are recommended resources that will serve researchers seeking more information on topics regarding undocumented immigrants.

The Children of Undocumented Immigrants

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Author :
Publisher : Greenhaven Publishing LLC
ISBN 13 : 153450253X
Total Pages : 100 pages
Book Rating : 4.5/5 (345 download)

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Book Synopsis The Children of Undocumented Immigrants by : David M. Haugen

Download or read book The Children of Undocumented Immigrants written by David M. Haugen and published by Greenhaven Publishing LLC. This book was released on 2013-08-08 with total page 100 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Migration Policy Institute released a fact sheet in 2016, stating that children born in the U.S. of a parent or parents who are undocumented immigrants, are placed at a severe disadvantage in life. This data was collected from 5.1 million children who are living with an unauthorized immigrant parent. Researchers found that these children are likely not to be enrolled in preschool, are likely to be held in a socioeconomic level that keeps them from developing and gaining access to resources, and are likely to fail in English proficiency that is necessary to move ahead in life. Place on top of that, the stress that their parent might be deported at any minute. These children are at risk, without a doubt. While U.S. policies on immigration and border control are hotly debated, this volume makes sure that we don't forget what's really at stake, the future of our young. Your readers are given the full breadth of perspectives on this topic, through eyewitness accounts, governmental views, scientific analysis, and newspaper accounts. Important details are pulled out from the text and presented in italicized font so that readers can track the facts, and refer to them for research and report writing. Most important of all, by reading balanced and well-researched entries, students will be able to form intelligent opinions on this pressing issue.

Undocumented Immigrants in an Era of Arbitrary Law

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Author :
Publisher : Routledge
ISBN 13 : 1317534336
Total Pages : 201 pages
Book Rating : 4.3/5 (175 download)

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Book Synopsis Undocumented Immigrants in an Era of Arbitrary Law by : Robert F. Barsky

Download or read book Undocumented Immigrants in an Era of Arbitrary Law written by Robert F. Barsky and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2015-08-11 with total page 201 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book describes the experiences of undocumented migrants, all around the world, bringing to life the challenges they face from the moment they consider leaving their country of origin, until the time they are deported back to it. Drawing on a broad array of academic studies, including law, interpretation and translation studies, border studies, human rights, communication, critical discourse analysis and sociology, Robert Barsky argues that the arrays of actions that are taken against undocumented migrants are often arbitrary, and exercised by an array of officials who can and do exercise considerable discretion, both positive and negative. Employing insights from a decade-long research project, Barsky also finds that every stop along the migrant’s pathway into, and inside of, the host country is strewn with language issues, relating to intercultural communication, interpretation, gossip, hearsay, and the challenges of peddling of linguistic wares in the social discourse marketplace. These language issues are almost always impediments to anodyne or productive interactions with host country officials, particularly on the "front-lines" where migrants encounter border patrol and law enforcement officers without adequate means of communicating their situation or understanding their rights. Since undocumented people are categorized as ‘illegal’, they can be subjected to abuse and exploitation by host country officials, who can choose to either tolerate or punish them on the basis of unpredictable, changeable, and even illusory or "arbitrary" laws and regulations. Citing experts at every level of the undocumented immigrant apparatuses worldwide, from public defenders to interpreters, Barsky concludes that the only viable policy to address prevailing abuses and inequalities is to move towards open borders, an approach that would address prevailing issues and, surprisingly, provide security and economic benefits to both host and home countries.

Undocumented Immigrants in an Era of Arbitrary Law

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Author :
Publisher : Routledge
ISBN 13 : 1317534344
Total Pages : 220 pages
Book Rating : 4.3/5 (175 download)

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Book Synopsis Undocumented Immigrants in an Era of Arbitrary Law by : Robert F. Barsky

Download or read book Undocumented Immigrants in an Era of Arbitrary Law written by Robert F. Barsky and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2015-08-11 with total page 220 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book describes the experiences of undocumented migrants, all around the world, bringing to life the challenges they face from the moment they consider leaving their country of origin, until the time they are deported back to it. Drawing on a broad array of academic studies, including law, interpretation and translation studies, border studies, human rights, communication, critical discourse analysis and sociology, Robert Barsky argues that the arrays of actions that are taken against undocumented migrants are often arbitrary, and exercised by an array of officials who can and do exercise considerable discretion, both positive and negative. Employing insights from a decade-long research project, Barsky also finds that every stop along the migrant’s pathway into, and inside of, the host country is strewn with language issues, relating to intercultural communication, interpretation, gossip, hearsay, and the challenges of peddling of linguistic wares in the social discourse marketplace. These language issues are almost always impediments to anodyne or productive interactions with host country officials, particularly on the "front-lines" where migrants encounter border patrol and law enforcement officers without adequate means of communicating their situation or understanding their rights. Since undocumented people are categorized as ‘illegal’, they can be subjected to abuse and exploitation by host country officials, who can choose to either tolerate or punish them on the basis of unpredictable, changeable, and even illusory or "arbitrary" laws and regulations. Citing experts at every level of the undocumented immigrant apparatuses worldwide, from public defenders to interpreters, Barsky concludes that the only viable policy to address prevailing abuses and inequalities is to move towards open borders, an approach that would address prevailing issues and, surprisingly, provide security and economic benefits to both host and home countries.

Illegal Immigration in America

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Author :
Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN 13 : 0313371415
Total Pages : 584 pages
Book Rating : 4.3/5 (133 download)

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Book Synopsis Illegal Immigration in America by : David W. Haines

Download or read book Illegal Immigration in America written by David W. Haines and published by Bloomsbury Publishing USA. This book was released on 1999-10-30 with total page 584 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Few issues have provoked as much controversy over the last decade as illegal immigration. While some argue for the need to seal America's borders and withdraw all forms of social and governmental support for illegal migrants and their children, others argue for humanitarian treatment—including legalization—for people who fill widely acknowledged needs in American industry and agriculture and have left home-country situations of economic hardship or political persecution. The study of illegal immigration necessarily confronts a broad range of migrants—from the familiar border crossers to those who enter illegally and overstay their visas, to the many unrecognized refugees who enter the country to seek protection under U.S. asylum law. The subject also demands attention to American society's responses to these newcomers—responses that often focus on limited elements of a complex issue. A comprehensive, up-to-date review of this volatile subject, this book provides an accessible, balanced introduction to the subject. Covering the full range of illegal immigrants from Mexican border crossers to Central American refugees, illegal Europeans, and smuggled Chinese, the book considers the kind of work the migrants do and the public response to them. The work is divided into four parts: Concepts, Policies, and Numbers; The Migrants and Their Work; The Responses; and Illegal Immigration in Perspective.

Undocumented in L.A.

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Author :
Publisher : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
ISBN 13 : 0585281610
Total Pages : 174 pages
Book Rating : 4.5/5 (852 download)

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Book Synopsis Undocumented in L.A. by : Dianne Walta Hart

Download or read book Undocumented in L.A. written by Dianne Walta Hart and published by Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. This book was released on 1997-06-01 with total page 174 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Her story is similar to those of the thousands of illegal immigrants who cross the border into America every day in search of political or economic refuge. In 1988, a woman in her late thirties named Yamileth obtains a passport, leaves her home, and makes a daring, dangerous trip from war-torn Nicaragua through Central America to the United States to join her family. In Los Angeles, Yamileth must find a place to live and a job to support her family, yet keep secret the fact that she entered the country as an illegal alien. She must adapt to new customs and the flood of Latino and Asian immigrants. She must live among the people of California, who in 1994 approved Proposition 187 with the intent to deny undocumented immigrants education, social services, and health care. Yamileth's daily experiences mirror the hopes and frustrations of women and men who must confront new cultural, economic, and political environments. Author Dianne Walta Hart's long and close relationship with Yamileth allows her to present Yamileth's cultural struggles and personal development in poignant narrative and passages in Yamileth's own words. From start to finish, Undocumented in L.A.: An Immigrant's Story is testimonial literature at its best. This eye-opening work will show the reader the opposition and difficulties undocumented immigrants face in a nation that at first beckons them with freedom, then rejects them with unwelcoming borders and restrictive laws. Undocumented in L.A.: An Immigrant's Story is an excellent resource for courses in immigration, political science, and social and cultural studies.

Illegal Immigration

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Author :
Publisher : ABDO Publishing Company
ISBN 13 : 1617852597
Total Pages : 114 pages
Book Rating : 4.6/5 (178 download)

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Book Synopsis Illegal Immigration by : Karen Latchana Kenney

Download or read book Illegal Immigration written by Karen Latchana Kenney and published by ABDO Publishing Company. This book was released on 2007-09-01 with total page 114 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Discusses the controversial viewpoints regarding illegal immigration.

Hidden Lives and Human Rights in the United States [3 volumes]

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Author :
Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN 13 :
Total Pages : 1298 pages
Book Rating : 4.2/5 (16 download)

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Book Synopsis Hidden Lives and Human Rights in the United States [3 volumes] by : Lois Ann Lorentzen

Download or read book Hidden Lives and Human Rights in the United States [3 volumes] written by Lois Ann Lorentzen and published by Bloomsbury Publishing USA. This book was released on 2014-07-23 with total page 1298 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The most comprehensive collection of essays on undocumented immigration to date, covering issues not generally found anywhere else on the subject. Three fascinating volumes feature the latest research from the country's top immigration scholars. In the United States, the crisis of undocumented immigrants draws strong opinions from both sides of the debate. For those who immigrate, concerns over safety, incorporation, and fair treatment arise upon arrival. For others, the perceived economic, political, and cultural impact of newcomers can feel threatening. In this informative three-volume set, top immigration scholars explain perspectives from every angle, examining facts and seeking solutions to counter the controversies often brought on by the current state of undocumented immigrant affairs. Immigration expert and set editor Lois Lorentzen leads a stellar team of contributors, laying out history, theories, and legislation in the first book; human rights, sexuality, and health in the second; and economics, politics, and morality in the final volume. From family separation, to human trafficking, to notions of citizenship, this provocative study captures the human costs associated with this type of immigration in the United States, questions policies intended to protect the "American way of life," and offers strategies for easing tensions between immigrants and natural-born citizens in everyday life.

Sanctuary Regions and the Struggle for Belonging

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Author :
Publisher : Springer Nature
ISBN 13 : 3030448851
Total Pages : 143 pages
Book Rating : 4.0/5 (34 download)

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Book Synopsis Sanctuary Regions and the Struggle for Belonging by : Zeina Sleiman-Long

Download or read book Sanctuary Regions and the Struggle for Belonging written by Zeina Sleiman-Long and published by Springer Nature. This book was released on 2020-05-04 with total page 143 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book argues that local governments and institutions across the state of California that offer various forms of sanctuaries to undocumented immigrants create “sanctuary regions.” These regions are safe zones for undocumented immigrants and facilitate their ability to make claims for human rights. The book also argues that these regions create an important form of resistance to federal state authority in terms of immigration and the management of borders – something that is typically attributed to state power in the study of International Relations (IR). This book includes overviews of how undocumented immigrants make claims for human rights as well as the ways in which sanctuary regions facilitate “acts of citizenship” and resist anti-immigrant policies.

Undocumented

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Author :
Publisher : Beacon Press
ISBN 13 : 0807001686
Total Pages : 256 pages
Book Rating : 4.8/5 (7 download)

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Book Synopsis Undocumented by : Aviva Chomsky

Download or read book Undocumented written by Aviva Chomsky and published by Beacon Press. This book was released on 2014-05-13 with total page 256 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Explores what it means to be undocumented in a legal, social, economic and historical context In this illuminating work, immigrant rights activist Aviva Chomsky shows how “illegality” and “undocumentedness” are concepts that were created to exclude and exploit. With a focus on US policy, she probes how people, especially Mexican and Central Americans, have been assigned this status—and to what ends. Blending history with human drama, Chomsky explores what it means to be undocumented in a legal, social, economic, and historical context. The result is a powerful testament of the complex, contradictory, and ever-shifting nature of status in America.

Shadowed Lives

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Author :
Publisher : Wadsworth Publishing Company
ISBN 13 :
Total Pages : 248 pages
Book Rating : 4.A/5 ( download)

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Book Synopsis Shadowed Lives by : Leo Ralph Chavez

Download or read book Shadowed Lives written by Leo Ralph Chavez and published by Wadsworth Publishing Company. This book was released on 1998 with total page 248 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: One of the few case studies of undocumented immigrants available, this insightful anthropological analysis humanizes a group of people too often reduced to statistics and stereotypes. The hardships of Hispanic migration are conveyed in the immigrants' own voices while the author's voice raises questions about power, stereotypes, settlement, and incorporation into American society.

Between the Lines

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Author :
Publisher : University of Arizona Press
ISBN 13 : 9780816515523
Total Pages : 340 pages
Book Rating : 4.5/5 (155 download)

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Book Synopsis Between the Lines by : Larry Siems

Download or read book Between the Lines written by Larry Siems and published by University of Arizona Press. This book was released on 1995-04-01 with total page 340 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In the continuing U.S. debate over illegal immigration, a human face has rarely been shown. The topic has been presented as a monolithic abstraction, a creation of statistics, political rhetoric, and fear. This collection of letters between undocumented immigrants in California and their families back home reveals the other side of the story. Published for the first time in paperback, Between the Lines reveals the often poignant human drama currently being played out along the U.S.-Mexico border. The letters, presented in Spanish and English, express powerful feelings of hope, uncertainty, and fear among the undocumented travelers as they arrive in the United States and seek work, social support and legal status. The letters from their families in Mexico, Guatemala, and El Salvador return feelings of hope, love, and support. Translator/editor Siems provides a powerful and lyrical introductory essay that sets the stage for the letters that follow.

Unauthorized

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Publisher : Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN 13 : 1442273836
Total Pages : 326 pages
Book Rating : 4.4/5 (422 download)

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Book Synopsis Unauthorized by : Marisol Clark-Ibáñez

Download or read book Unauthorized written by Marisol Clark-Ibáñez and published by Rowman & Littlefield. This book was released on 2019-06-21 with total page 326 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Unauthorized: Portraits of Latino Immigrants takes readers inside the diverse contemporary worlds of undocumented Latino immigrants in the United States, exploring the myths and realities of education, health care, work, deportation, and more. This book aims to dispel common misconceptions while introducing readers to real people behind the headlines.

The Undocumented Americans

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Author :
Publisher : One World
ISBN 13 : 0399592695
Total Pages : 210 pages
Book Rating : 4.3/5 (995 download)

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Book Synopsis The Undocumented Americans by : Karla Cornejo Villavicencio

Download or read book The Undocumented Americans written by Karla Cornejo Villavicencio and published by One World. This book was released on 2020-03-24 with total page 210 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST • One of the first undocumented immigrants to graduate from Harvard reveals the hidden lives of her fellow undocumented Americans in this deeply personal and groundbreaking portrait of a nation. “Karla’s book sheds light on people’s personal experiences and allows their stories to be told and their voices to be heard.”—Selena Gomez FINALIST FOR THE NBCC JOHN LEONARD AWARD • NAMED A BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR BY THE LOS ANGELES TIMES, THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW, NPR, THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY, BOOK RIOT, LIBRARY JOURNAL, AND TIME Writer Karla Cornejo Villavicencio was on DACA when she decided to write about being undocumented for the first time using her own name. It was right after the election of 2016, the day she realized the story she’d tried to steer clear of was the only one she wanted to tell. So she wrote her immigration lawyer’s phone number on her hand in Sharpie and embarked on a trip across the country to tell the stories of her fellow undocumented immigrants—and to find the hidden key to her own. Looking beyond the flashpoints of the border or the activism of the DREAMers, Cornejo Villavicencio explores the lives of the undocumented—and the mysteries of her own life. She finds the singular, effervescent characters across the nation often reduced in the media to political pawns or nameless laborers. The stories she tells are not deferential or naively inspirational but show the love, magic, heartbreak, insanity, and vulgarity that infuse the day-to-day lives of her subjects. In New York, we meet the undocumented workers who were recruited into the federally funded Ground Zero cleanup after 9/11. In Miami, we enter the ubiquitous botanicas, which offer medicinal herbs and potions to those whose status blocks them from any other healthcare options. In Flint, Michigan, we learn of demands for state ID in order to receive life-saving clean water. In Connecticut, Cornejo Villavicencio, childless by choice, finds family in two teenage girls whose father is in sanctuary. And through it all we see the author grappling with the biggest questions of love, duty, family, and survival. In her incandescent, relentlessly probing voice, Karla Cornejo Villavicencio combines sensitive reporting and powerful personal narratives to bring to light remarkable stories of resilience, madness, and death. Through these stories we come to understand what it truly means to be a stray. An expendable. A hero. An American.